Leadership Style and Strategies

Leadership Style and Strategies

I have observed various leadership styles, techniques and strategies in the course of my interactions with colleagues, classmates, and mentors. Research has proven that three main types of leadership exist, namely – transformation leadership, transactional leadership and servant leadership. I believe I am a transformational leader – one that is visionary, inspiring and constantly engaging with followers to create a balanced and effective team. I believe a constant engagement with my followers is key to helping them realise their full potentials and also to help them become and mentor others. My style of leadership has not quite changed over a period of time, as I always do my best to inspire others to take-up responsibilities and help them achieve greater results. I am passionate about constantly engaging with my followers, modeling the way by leading by example, having a shared organisational vision, and encouraging others to take actions and lead. Leaders behave differently in a variety of context, given their skills and traits. The way in which leaders behave is analysed based on two different perspectives, namely – task-oriented or people-oriented. While the task-oriented leaders focus on results, goals, outcomes; the people-oriented leaders are known to focus on staff satisfaction. Based on Blake and Mouton’s leadership assessment grid (Blake & Mouton, 1964), I would say I have “team management” style of leadership, which focusses on achieving the set objectives as well as keeping individuals satisfied.

The Perspective on Motivation

Motivation is a goal-oriented approach that helps an individual achieve his or her objectives. Leadership and motivation are intertwined in that the success of a particular leader in any healthcare organisation is dependent on how well he is able to motivate his followers. Motivation is suggested to be anything that affects behaviour in pursuing a certain outcome. These outcomes or results are the organisational goals, and motivation is required to achieve these end results. To be highly successful in an organisation, a leader must be able to motivate his followers to achieve beyond the minimum expected results. It is easy to underestimate the value of motivation within an organisational context, owing to the fact that every individual receives a pay cheque at the end of the month – which should serve as enough motivation – however, this alone might not influence an individual to deliver on his job. Therefore, it important for a leader to motivate his team members to ensure they deliver excellent results.

Motivation will continue to be as important for a team as it is to leadership. The ability of a leader to motivate a team is also crucial to an organisation, so much so that it now forms part of some key performance indicators used to assess the effectiveness of a leader in the workplace.